Dr. Bhabatosh Das

Dr. Bhabatosh Das

Centre for Human Microbial Ecology,
THSTI, India.

I am a Molecular Biologist trained in Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (IICB), Kolkata and Institute of Integrative Biology of the Cell (I2CB), France. Currently, I am working as Assistant Professor in Translational Health Science and Technology Institute (THSTI), Dept. of Biotechnology, Govt. of India. My current research focus is oriented to understand-

i) The ecological principles of the microbial communities inhibiting in the human body and their role in health and diseases. The human gastrointestinal tract, the major site of nutrient assimilation and micronutrient production, is populated with trillions of microbial species from all the three domains of life. Bacterial species, in particular, play crucial role in the digestion of complex dietary polysaccharides by providing several enzymatic functions that are not encoded in the human genome. Healthy immune system and balanced community of gut microbiota are crucial for human health. Abrupt changes in microbiota (dysbiosis) can potentiate several health disorders including malnourishment, inflammatory bowel disease, metabolic and neuronal diseases, colorectal cancer, coronary heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune and psychiatric disorders.

ii) The genomic repertoires of gut microbiota by adopting functional metagenomics approaches. We wish to understand the mechanisms that connenct the human gut microbiota to the efficacy and toxicity of xenobiotics, including antimicrobial drugs and complex dietary compounds and how gut microbiota contribute in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance traits in enteric pathogens. The genes encoding antibiotic resistance (AMR) are physically linked with mobile genetic elements and could disseminate vertically to the progeny and laterally to the distantly related microbial species. Consequently, the AMR genes present in the chromosome of gut commensals could be a potential source of resistance functions for the enteric pathogens.